Shredded Brussels Sprouts with Pomegranate Seeds, Walnuts, and Manchego

Shredded-Brussels-Sprouts
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Shredded Brussels Sprouts with Pomegranate Seeds, Walnuts, and Manchego
Servings
servings
Servings
servings
Ingredients
WINE PAIRING
Instructions
WHISK together the vinegar, lemon zest, lemon juice, Dijon mustard, ¾ tsp of salt, and several grinds of pepper in a large bowl. Add the sprouts and toss well to combine and coat the sprouts. Let stand to marinate, 5 minutes.
DRIZZLE in 1 tbsp of the walnut oil and the 2 tbsps of olive oil and toss well to combine. Add the pomegranate seeds, walnuts, and all but about ¼ cup of the Manchego. Toss well and adjust salt and pepper and the walnut oil to taste. Transfer to a serving bowl or individual shallow bowls and top with the remaining Manchego, and sprinkle with more lemon zest if you wish.
Note: There are more reverent ways than this one to separate pomegranate seeds from their pith and membrane, but I recommend the following method for ease, speed, and a no-mess outcome. Trim a small piece off the top, stem end of the pomegranate. Resting the fruit on its cut end, cut it vertically into quarters along its natural ridges. Submerge the sections in a bowl of cool water and use your fingers to gently rub and release the seeds from the pith that surrounds them. The water helps keep the juice from splattering onto you and your kitchen. It also allows the white pith to float to the top, making it easier to skim and discard it. Drain the pomegranate seeds. You will lose some of their tart-sweet juice in the process, but not enough to worry about.
Ingredients
WINE PAIRING
Instructions
WHISK together the vinegar, lemon zest, lemon juice, Dijon mustard, ¾ tsp of salt, and several grinds of pepper in a large bowl. Add the sprouts and toss well to combine and coat the sprouts. Let stand to marinate, 5 minutes.
DRIZZLE in 1 tbsp of the walnut oil and the 2 tbsps of olive oil and toss well to combine. Add the pomegranate seeds, walnuts, and all but about ¼ cup of the Manchego. Toss well and adjust salt and pepper and the walnut oil to taste. Transfer to a serving bowl or individual shallow bowls and top with the remaining Manchego, and sprinkle with more lemon zest if you wish.
Note: There are more reverent ways than this one to separate pomegranate seeds from their pith and membrane, but I recommend the following method for ease, speed, and a no-mess outcome. Trim a small piece off the top, stem end of the pomegranate. Resting the fruit on its cut end, cut it vertically into quarters along its natural ridges. Submerge the sections in a bowl of cool water and use your fingers to gently rub and release the seeds from the pith that surrounds them. The water helps keep the juice from splattering onto you and your kitchen. It also allows the white pith to float to the top, making it easier to skim and discard it. Drain the pomegranate seeds. You will lose some of their tart-sweet juice in the process, but not enough to worry about.

The Vegetable Butcher by Cara Mangini • Workman Publishing • Photography by Matthew Benson

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